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October 26, 2011

Filed under: Uncategorized — springtwist @ 9:20 am

dear government of canada,

DO YOU NOT SEE THIS BLATANTLY OBVIOUS CONTRADICTION?

the government promises (on its own website) this first:

“Organic produce

Whether to eat organic or conventionally grown produce is a personal choice. Health Canada regulates all products that make pesticidal claims, including products intended to repel pests and protect organic produce. To date, there is no evidence to show indicate that there is a health risk from eating conventionally grown produce because of pesticide residues, or that organic foods are safer to consume than conventionally produced food.”

then, on the same page, they say this:

“Sustainable and integrated pest management

Sustainable pest management happens when pest management strategies are integrated: that is, when all possible effective techniques, including both chemical and non-chemical methods, have been considered to get rid of pests economically, in an environmentally sound manner, and in a way that protects human health.

Health Canada encourages Canadians, including growers, to reduce their reliance on and minimize their exposure to pesticides. Through different programs at the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Health Canada works with partners like Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and with Canadian pesticide users, to achieve sustainable pest management. Health Canada also works with the provinces and industry associations on research projects to identify and promote different methods to effectively control pests and prevent infestations, and to identify and provide access to newer, reduced risk pesticides.”

so why, government, if, “To date, there is no evidence to show indicate that there is a health risk from eating conventionally grown produce because of pesticide residues,” do you caution people “to reduce their reliance on and minimize their exposure to pesticides” and promise that you are going to ” identify and provide access to newer, reduced risk pesticides.”

then, one page over:

“General Safety Precautions

  • Always read the label carefully. You must follow all safety precautions described on the product label to protect your health, the health of others and the environment.
  • Generally, pesticide application should only be done when there are no children, pregnant women, elderly persons, pets or animals present.
  • Never mix or combine different pesticides together unless the label instructions say to do so.
  • Use a pesticide only for its intended purpose, for example, never use a pesticide indoors when it is intended for outdoor use.
  • Do not apply pesticides directly to people, clothing or bedding, except when told to do so on the label (like when using personal insect repellents).

Additional Safety Precautions

Pregnant women should follow the additional safety precaution of not entering a pesticide-treated area for 24 hours after the pesticide has been applied. Pregnant women may also be more sensitive to the strong odour of ingredients contained in some pesticides. The odour itself is not harmful and should go away if there is enough ventilation. This residual odour may be caused by trace amounts of sulphur-based compounds and solvents in the pesticide.

Children and pets should not be allowed to enter a pesticide-treated area until the applied product is dry, or as specifically directed on the label.

As with many natural and synthetic products, some pesticides may cause allergic reactions in some people. Information on known allergic reactions can be found on the product label. Persons prone to allergic reactions should stay out of the treated area for a period of 24 hours after application.

General Guidelines for Indoor Use of Pesticides

  • Cover or remove food, dishes and utensils from any area that is to be treated.
  • Cover or remove aquariums and pet food dishes.
  • Do not smoke, drink or eat while applying pesticides.
  • Do not rub your eyes or touch your mouth while working with pesticides.
  • After applying pesticides, wash your hands and face with hot soapy water.
  • Do not touch treated surfaces until the pesticide has dried completely (label directions will tell you the anticipated drying time).
  • To help the product dry, provide some air ventilation (for example, open your doors and windows for a few hours).
  • Wash all surfaces that normally come in direct contact with food with hot soapy water, like counters, tables and stove tops.

General Guidelines for Outdoor Use of Pesticides

  • When using a pesticide for the control of home garden pests, be sure to wait the directed amount of time for each garden crop before harvesting.
  • Never spray a pesticide outdoors if wind speed is more than 8 kph (5 mph), or if the air temperature is above 30°C (86°F), or if it is raining. Check your local weather forecast for up-to-date temperature, wind and precipitation information.
  • If noted on the pesticide label, post appropriate warning signs to notify neighbours so that children and pets may be kept away from the treated area.
  • Wear protective clothing as stated on the label, like rubber gloves, long-sleeved shirts, aprons or coveralls. Keep sleeves outside gloves and pants outside boots to prevent the pesticide from getting inside gloves or boots.
  • Use only the rate of application stated on the label. A higher rate may cause injury to plants, kill beneficial insects, and leave undesired residues on plants. On the other hand, a lower rate may not control the pest at all.
  • Do not smoke, drink or eat while applying pesticides.
  • Do not rub your eyes or touch your mouth while working with pesticides.
  • After applying pesticides, wash your hands and face with hot soapy water.
  • Thoroughly wash clothes used during application, separate from regular laundry.
  • Many residual pesticides can be removed from surfaces simply by washing with soap and water.”

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/pest/_fact-fiche/_home-maison/index-eng.php

This one, however, is fantastic

The Food We Eat: An International Comparison of Pesticide Regulations b y   David R. boyd

http://www.fondationtrudeau.ca/download/resource/library/publishe/boyd/boyddt~3?attachment=1

this one too.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/science-sushi/2011/07/18/mythbusting-101-organic-farming-conventional-agriculture/

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